Stan’s Overlook Rattlesnake Mountain Hike

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Stan’s Overlook is a mellow and less crowded alternative to Rattlesnake Ledge on the opposite side of Rattlesnake Mountain. Part of a ten mile trail across Rattlesnake Mountain, it criss crosses with mountain bike trails but the hiker trails are mostly separated. Four miles round trip with approximately 1000 feet of elevation gain.

Is Stan’s Overlook on Rattlesnake Mountain right for me?

If you’re looking for a less crowded alternative to Rattlesnake Ledge in the same area with a similar view, and don’t mind dodging a few mountain bikes at the trailhead this is a good hike for all year and any weather. I enjoyed it recently on an extremely foggy and wet day where you couldn’t see the view at all, but the solitude and convenience of it’s location totally made up for that!

What time of year is good for Stan’s Overlook?

Any time! This is what makes it so great. I hiked it recently on a cold, rainy, foggy day and I really enjoyed it. With the view it would be even better. I did wear rubber boots (like I often do) as it was a bit muddy in places with all the rain.

Trees in the fog
The view on my recent visit was non existent…but here is where you would see an awesome view of Mt Si and North Bend!

Where is Stan’s Overlook Rattlesnake Mountain?

The trailhead for Stan’s Overlook is at the opposite end of the Rattlesnake Mountain trail from Rattlesnake ledge. To get there, take exit 27 from I-90 (between Issaquah and North Bend), turning right at the bottom of the exit ramp. This road takes you straight there in just under a mile. Turn right into the parking lot that has a sign for needing a Discover Pass (you need a Discover Pass here). This is just before you enter the parking area for Snoqualmie Point park.

Trail Description

Don’t be put off by mountain bikers in the parking lot! You’ll only share the trail with them for a few hundred yards (I think mountain biking is great, but I’m not wild about sharing the trail with them, especially with my puppy who is still learning leash walking!). There are a few places where you will cross their trail or be on it for a very short distance, not a big deal at all.

A wooden sign notes the distance to various destinations on the Rattlesnake Mountain Trail.
For the most part this trail is very well signed (except one key moment described below)

You’ll go a couple hundred yards up the trail and here the bike trail separates. There is a big sign about mountain biking, the hiking trail is marked and ahead of you. The first half of the trail is wider, the second half is a little narrower but still plenty of room to not get too wet brushing against the vegetation on a rainy day! A few times you will cross the mountain bike trails, but the intersections are marked. Keep following the signs towards Stan’s Overlook (no idea who Stan was!) and Grand Prospect. Towards the end, I thought I had missed it because Stan’s Overlook dropped off the last sign and it said “Grand Prospect” only. I couldn’t see any other trails (other than a mountain bike one) so decided to go a bit farther. I’m glad I stuck with it because the overlook was not too much farther. When you are almost there, there’s a junction with a mountain bike trail and a sign. Follow the mountain bike trail for less than a quarter mile and you’ll come to a picnic area with a great view (or fog, lol). Once you’ve had your rest and your snacks and taken in the view, head back down the way you came!

A forested trail on a rainy day. Text reads: Stan's Overlook hike near Seattle, less crowded than Rattlesnake ledge
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Jennie Flaming
Jennie Thwing Flaming, Chief Adventure Officer: Jennie's life has been a continual quest for adventure (of the non-adrenalin inducing kind) from birth till now. Professionally, she pursues adventures in teaching, counseling and working to obliterate institutional racism for students in our region's public schools and also works as a tour and hiking guide. Previous professional adventures include working in schools in Seattle and Alaska, leading tours and managing tour guides and presenting traveling science shows and lessons with Pacific Science Center. She believes in sharing her beloved Pacific Northwest home with visitors. She likes to be outdoors and spend time with the people she loves. Jennie is born and raised in Seattle and has also lived in Alaska and the Netherlands.