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25 Spectacular Waterfalls in Washington State

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The incredible waterfalls in Washington State are among the most beautiful you’ll see anywhere! There are waterfalls in every corner of this beautiful state. Some waterfalls are viewable a very short walk from parking, others are longer or more strenuous hikes. As a born and raised Washingtonian, I’ll share how to find them, the best time to go and how much hiking is involved.

Most waterfalls in Washington are accessible all year. Generally spring is the absolute best time of year to see waterfalls in Washington, when snowmelt adds to the volume of water.

Related: Best Waterfall Hikes near Seattle, 5 Best Olympic National Park Waterfalls

If you’d like to shortcut to how much hiking you want to do to get to a waterfall in Washington, you can do that here:

Waterfalls in Washington with little or no hiking

The nine waterfalls on this list involve less than a mile of walking round trip and do not involve significant up or down hill walking. Additional details about accessibility are included with each. Less walking doesn’t mean less spectacular!

Whatcom Falls (Bellingham)

A wide waterfall going over rocks with a surrounding forest
Whatcom Falls is wide, gorgeous and accessible for all ability levels
Photo Credit: Brandon Fralic
  • Why it’s awesome: Gorgeous Whatcom Falls is a very short walk on a paved trail from the parking area and includes a beautiful stone bridge. If you want to get more walking in, you can enjoy the four miles of trails in the park.
  • Where it is: Whatcom Falls Park, Bellingham
  • Best Season: All year! Spring and Fall and periods of rain bring extra water and a wider waterfall
  • Walking Distance: Less than 1/4 mile round trip
  • Elevation gain: Minimal
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash; there is also an off leash trail in the park
  • Parking Pass: None

Narada Falls (Mt Rainier National Park)

A frozen waterfall in washington state in Mt Rainier National Park. There is snow in the foreground and rocks and trees around frozen Narada Falls
Frozen Narada Falls in winter
  • Why it’s awesome: A rushing waterfall with an immense amount of power, Narada Falls is a mandatory stop if you’re driving to Paradise on Mt Rainier. You can see it from above before going down the short and steep trail to the viewing platform where you are sure to be covered in spray in summer! When snow is present on the trail, use extreme caution (snowshoes are really helpful) and stay far back from the edge as the railing may be covered by snow. This makes for an excellent starting point for a snowshoe adventure (and has restrooms open year round).
  • Where it is: Narada Falls is about 5 miles before Paradise on the road from Mt Rainier’s Nisqually entrance.
  • Best Season: All year (use caution when snow is present!)
  • Hiking Distance: 1/2 mile round trip to the viewing area and back
  • Elevation gain: 100 feet down to the viewing area, and 100 feet back up
  • Dogs Allowed: No, dogs are not allowed on any trails in Mt Rainier National Park
  • Parking Pass: A $30 entrance fee per vehicle, pay at the entrance station

Myrtle Falls (Mt Rainier National Park)

A waterfall with a bridge over it and a few people on a hiking trail. In the background is Mt Rainier, and a few clouds surround it. There are trees and a green meadow beside the trail and waterfall.
Myrtle Falls is less than half a mile on a paved trail from the Paradise parking lot
  • Why it’s awesome: This waterfall is absolutely beautiful and from below you can see Mt Rainier behind the waterfall which makes it extremely photogenic! It’s also located in a spectacular wildflower meadow and many other hikes in the area, such as the Skyline Trail. It is also less than half a mile to get there on a paved trail. There area few stairs, however. This area is also extremely crowded. Myrtle falls is on every list of the best waterfalls in Washington, which makes it very popular (and amazing!).
  • Where it is: Myrtle Falls is located at Paradise in Mt Rainier National Park
  • Best Season: Snow free months at Paradise, generally mid July through sometimes in October (wildflowers are usually at their peak late July and early August)
  • Walking Distance: Just under a mile round trip
  • Elevation gain: minimal
  • Dogs Allowed: No, dogs are not allowed on any trails in Mt Rainier National Park
  • Parking Pass: A $30 entrance fee per vehicle, pay at the entrance station

Madison Falls (Olympic National Park)

  • Why it’s awesome: Madison Falls is a beautiful waterfall accessible on a flat, paved trail with an ADA accessible pit toilet at the trailhead as well as a beautiful picnic area. The picnic tables are under giant big leaf maple trees and across the road from the mighty Elwha River. This is an excellent lunch stop on a trip to Olympic National Park. Read more about Madison Falls here.
  • Where it is: Two miles off Highway 101 between Port Angeles and Lake Crescent in Olympic National Park
  • Best Season: All year! This waterfall is particularly impressive in the spring when the snowmelt is at it’s peak (March – May)
  • Walking Distance: Less than 1/4 mile
  • Elevation gain: none
  • Dogs Allowed: No
  • Parking Pass: none

Rocky Brook Falls (Olympic Peninsula)

A wide waterfall seeing from below coming over a boulder field with rocks and trees on each side
  • Why it’s awesome: You can get right up close to this towering waterfall, especially refreshing on a hot day! It’s a short walk up a wide, gently sloped trail. While the trail itself is wide and smooth, the area around the base of the waterfall requires climbing around on slippery rocks.
  • Where it is: on the Olympic Penninsula, 3 miles off highway 101 just north of the town of Brinnon. Turn on Dosewallips road and look for a bridge about 3 miles from the highway. Park just past this bridge and walk right (upstream)
  • Best Season: All year! Like most waterfalls in Washington, it has the most water in spring (March-May)
  • Walking Distance: less than 1/4 mile
  • Elevation gain: minimal
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking Pass Needed: none

Panther Creek Falls (Columbia River Gorge)

  • Why it’s awesome: While most of the impressive waterfalls in the Columbia River Gorge are in Oregon, this one is on the Washington side! A very short walk leads you to this high and wide waterfall in a beautiful forest.
  • Where it is: about 20 miles north of Cascade Locks, Oregon; from Cascade Locks/Bridge of the Gods, head east on Highway 14 (on the Washington side). Turn left on the Wind River Highway in Carson and then right on Forest Service Road 65. After parking, cross the road and look left for the trail heading downhill
  • Best Season: All year, like most waterfalls in Washington this one is especially good in spring (March-May)
  • Walking or Hiking Distance: less than 1/4 mile
  • Elevation gain: 100 feet down, 100 feet back up
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking Pass: none

Ladder Creek Falls (North Cascades)

  • Why it’s awesome: This narrow cascade of many “ladders” through the rocks makes a nice leg stretch when driving the North Cascades Highway. A very unique thing here is the light show on the falls (thanks to Seattle City Light, who operate the nearby dam) from dusk until midnight! Note: while the trail is short there are some stairs.
  • Where it is: in Newhalem, park by the powerhouse and cross the suspension bridge behind it
  • Best Season: Late Spring/early Summer (May and June) and Fall
  • Walking or Hiking Distance: 1/2 mile round trip
  • Elevation gain: minimal
  • Dogs Allowed: No
  • Parking Pass: none

Crystal Falls (Northeast Washington)

A waterfall tumbles over rocks with some green trees and red and brown bushes surrounding it
Crystal Falls is right below Highway 20
  • Why it’s awesome: A gorgeous waterfall just below the highway makes for a nice leg stretch on the gorgeous drive along Highway 20 in Northeast Washington. A picnic table makes for a nice lunch spot too.
  • Where it is: Located on the south side of Highway 20, 15 miles east of the town of Colville. Look for a sign and a pullout on the right side if you’re heading east.
  • Best Season: All year! Watch out for ice on the rocks in the viewing area in winter
  • Walking Distance: a few steps down from the pullout on the highway
  • Elevation gain: none
  • Dogs Allowed: yes
  • Parking Pass: none

Spokane Falls (Downtown Spokane)

  • Why it’s awesome: Not only is this an impressive flow of water over giant rocks right downtown in Washington’s second largest city, it’s the only waterfall in Washington that you can FLY OVER IN A GONDOLA (an ADA accessible gondola!). Actually, it’s the only place I know of that you can do that anywhere! Don’t worry, though, if you’re not keen on flying over rushing water. You can also view it from the pedestrian suspension bridge and other parts of Riverfront and Huntington Park. Learn all about the many ways to see the falls, their natural and cultural history as well as more about the present and history of the Spokane Tribe here.
  • Where it is: Downtown Spokane
  • Best Season: All year! You probably won’t be surprised to hear that spring is a great time to visit, just like many waterfalls in Washington! Spring is also a great time to visit the Spokane area, with it’s sunny days and the Bloomsday Festival.
  • Walking or Hiking Distance: varies, there are lots of trails in the various parks, but you can also park very close to the falls in downtown paid garages.
  • Elevation gain: none
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash (but not in the gondola)

Waterfalls in Washington you can reach on short hikes (1-3 miles)

These ten waterfall hikes are at least a mile walk, but none are more than three miles (except Falls Creek Falls, read more below). These are perfect outings for when you’re looking for a big payoff without a long hike. Some of these are fairly flat, others involve more climbing. They are listed in order from shortest to longest.

Palouse Falls (Southeast Washington)

A high waterfall in washington state plunges down a straight rock wall into a pool. There are a few shrubs around on the otherwise dry land above it.
Palouse Falls appears to come straight out of nowhere into the pool below!
Photo Credit: Adam Sawyer
  • Why it’s awesome: Palouse Falls is right at the top of every best waterfalls of Washington list! In the middle of beautiful and arid Eastern Washington, the Palouse River takes a 200 foot plunge straight into a hole in the rocks. It’s absolutely spectacular! Even though it’s not close to any large towns or cities, expect to encounter lots of other waterfall lovers in this beautiful place, especially one weekends.
  • Where it is: Palouse Falls is in Palouse Falls State park, not particularly close to anything but about halfway between the Tri Cities and Pullman. From Highway 26 (between Vantage and Pullman), head south in Washtucna on Highway 261, and then left on Palouse Falls Road. From the Tri Cities, take highway 395 north to Connell, then East on Highway 260 to Highway 261. Turn right on Highway 261 then left on Palouse Falls Road.
  • Best Season: All year!
  • Hiking Distance: 1 mile round trip
  • Elevation gain: 200 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking Pass: Washington State Discover Pass

Snoqualmie Falls (East of Seattle)

A wide and high waterfall in washington state plunges over mossy rocks to the river below, surrounded by forest
Snoqualmie Falls on a rainy spring day
  • Why it’s awesome: A truly impressive volume of water crashes down this famous waterfall less than 30 miles from Seattle. There’s a lodge with famous pancakes too! Expect big crowds year round but don’t let that keep you away from this must see waterfall! The trail is wide and graveled.
  • Where it is: Snoqualmie, WA; from I-90, take Snoqualmie Parkway and then left on Railroad Ave to the parking lot
  • Best Season: All year! This is particularly impressive during heavy rains.
  • Walking Distance: 1.5 miles
  • Elevation gain: 200 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: No
  • Parking Pass: There are two free lots and one paid ($7)

Murhut Falls (Olympic Peninsula)

A high and narrow waterfall in washington state in a thick green rainforest
Murhut Falls is so high and narrow it almost seems like an upright river through the forest
  • Why it’s awesome: Murhut Falls is one of my personal favorites. It’s incredibly high and tumbles magnificently through the Olympic Rainforest. Add to that a mellow forest hike to get there and this is a trail to love! Most of the trail is smooth and flat, there is a rocky section of climbing at the very end.
  • Where it is: On the Olympic Peninsula near Hood Canal and the town of Brinnon. From Brinnon, head south on Highway 101 to Duckabush Road. Turn right and arrive at the trailhead in 7.5 miles.
  • Best Season: Spring and Fall
  • Hiking Distance: 1.5 miles
  • Elevation gain: 300 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking Pass: Northwest Forest pass

Sol Duc Falls (Olympic National Park)

A three tiered waterfall goes into a narrow rock canyon surrounded by moss and forest
Unforgettable Sol Duc Falls
  • Why it’s awesome: Another right-at-the-top for best waterfalls in Washington is epic Sol Duc Falls. This three tiered falls has crashing water all summer. Add to it a short hike through a famous rainforest and you have basically the perfect hike! You can camp and soak in nearby Sol Duc Hot Springs after your hike for the perfect day of adventure.
  • Where it is: The trailhead is at the end of Sol Duc Road in Olympic National Park. The road is typically open from late March through late October.
  • Best Season: Anytime the road is open (late March through October)
  • Hiking Distance: 1.6 miles round trip (you can make a longer 7 mile adventure by hiking a loop from the campground)
  • Elevation gain: 200 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: No
  • Parking Pass: Olympic National Park entrance fee ($30 per vehicle)

Silver Falls (Central Washington)

Spray from Silver Falls in the Entiat River Valleyl comes down a steep rock cliff. Some of the rocks are moss covered.
The spray of Silver Falls!
  • Why it’s awesome: Silver Falls in the Entiat Valley might be my personal favorite waterfall in Washington! Hardly anyone knows about it so it’s never crowded, the hike is relatively short, there are views and wildflowers and you get to see the amazing waterfall from lots of angles! A word of caution: this hike is definitely NOT easy. It’s quite steep and there are lots of steps to climb.
  • Where it is: Silver Falls is in the Entiat River Valley 50 miles from Lake Chelan. From Chelan, head south on Highway 97 to the town of Entiat and turn on Entiat River Road and go 30 miles to the trailhead.
  • Best Season: All year!
  • Hiking Distance: 1.7 miles
  • Elevation gain: 600 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking Pass: Northwest Forest pass

Marymere Falls (Olympic National Park)

A waterfall in washington starts very narrow at the top and gets wider at the bottom. The waterfall is straight down and surrounded by moss and logs.
Impossibly narrow Marymere Falls gets wider as it flows down the rock wall
  • Why it’s awesome: This short hike through a beautiful old growth forest with trees hundreds of years old to a fairy tale waterfall is a wonderful hike for kids. Anyone who appreciates water, forest and waterfalls will love it. Most of the hike is wide, flat and smooth. The last short distance to the waterfall is steep, but there’s a railing if you need a boost.
  • Where it is: Marymere Falls is near Lake Crescent in Olympic National Park. Park at the Storm King Ranger Station.
  • Best Season: This is a wonderful hike year round
  • Hiking Distance: Just under two miles round trip
  • Elevation gain: 500 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: No
  • Parking Pass: none

Franklin Falls (Snoqualmie Pass)

  • Why it’s awesome: Franklin Falls is Instagram famous and one of the most beautiful waterfalls in Washington. Warning: It is directly under the freeway and you can see and hear the freeway when you’re under it. The crashing water does a lot to reduce the freeway noise, but it’s there when you’re hiking and at the waterfall. Because of it’s sheer beauty though, it still belongs on this list!
  • Where it is: Near Snoqualmie Pass. Take Exit 47 (Denny Creek) from I-90. Take Forest service road 5800 about three miles to the trailhead.
  • Best Season: For a snow free adventure, late June through October (or maybe early November). For snowshoeing, December through March.
  • Hiking Distance: 2 miles round trip (in winter this trip becomes a longer snowshoe adventure, exact length depends on snow and where the road is closed)
  • Elevation gain: 400 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking Pass: Northwest Forest pass

Silver Falls (Mt Rainier National Park)

A series of cascades in a waterfall surrounded by evergreen trees in a forest
  • Why it’s awesome: Another Silver Falls! Yes! This one is in a completely different environment and just as beautiful! A flat loop from Ohanapecosh takes you here, or you can go down a short but steep trail from the pullout on the highway. Learn more about Silver Falls and the rarely visited eastside of Mt Rainier National Park here.
  • Where it is: This Silver Falls is located just below Highway 123 north of Ohanapecosh in Mt Rainier National Park. You can access it from an unsigned pullout with a tiny trail sign low to the ground after you park, or you can take a longer and mostly flat loop from the Ohanapecosh campground.
  • Best Season: late May and June – the rapid melt of water is really impressive here! The road through the eastside of the park is typically open from late May through early November.
  • Hiking Distance: 3 miles (the campground loop) or 1 mile (from the pullout)
  • Elevation gain: 100 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: No
  • Parking Pass: $30 Mt Rainier National Park entrance fee at Ohanapecosh. No pass needed at the pullout.

Twin Falls (East of Seattle)

A wide and high waterfall cascades over a vertical rock face. There are trees and green shrubs around it
Twin Falls from the viewing platform
  • Why it’s awesome: You can see Twin Falls by walking over the bridge between two parts of it as well as from a viewing platform directly across from it. The roar of the water and the beauty of the forest and river are hard to top and this is an excellent hike with kids. There are lots of logs to play on and places to play by the river. This trail gets extremely crowded in the summer
  • Where it is: North Bend; Take Exit 34 and head away from town (right if you’re coming from Seattle). In just over a mile from the freeway, turn left at the sign for Twin Falls. This will take you straight to the parking lot.
  • Best Season: All year, but in my opinion this is a fantastic winter hike (November through February). Wear rubber boots though, it’s super muddy in the winter!
  • Hiking Distance: 3 miles
  • Elevation gain: 600 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking Pass: Washington State Discover Pass

Falls Creek Falls (North Cascades)

  • Why it’s awesome: With four lovely waterfalls on a gentle grade, you can choose how far you want to wander on this mellow trail. A great outing if you’re visiting the town of Winthrop!
  • Where it is: 12 miles North of Winthrop; head north on Bluff Road becoming East Chewuch Road. Join up with Eastside Chewack Road for another four miles
  • Best Season: Spring, Summer, Fall
  • Hiking Distance: 1/2 mile to 4 miles
  • Elevation gain: Flat or up to a couple hundred feet
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking Pass: None

Boulder River Falls (Mountain Loop Highway)

Two sides of a high waterfall coming over a moss and fern covered cliff through the forest into the Boulder River
  • Why it’s awesome: A high waterfall with two cascades crashing down a sheer rock wall into the wild Boulder River is a highlight of this forest and river hike.
  • Where it is: Between Arlington and Darrington along Highway 530.
  • Best Season: All year! waterfall flow is especially good March through May and November and December
  • Hiking Distance: 3 miles round trip (the Boulder River Trail continues further and you can go up to 9 miles round trip and see a couple additional waterfalls if you like)
  • Elevation gain: 300 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking Pass: None

Longer hikes to Waterfalls in Washington

These six Washington waterfalls require more effort to get to, ranging from mellow to quite hard and long! I’ve listed them roughly in the order of difficulty (combination of length, climbing and trail conditions).

Cherry Creek Falls (East of Seattle)

At the end of the Cherry Creek Falls hike is gorgeous Cherry Creek Falls. It has two sides that plunge over a rock into a pool below. The waterfall is surrounded by evergreen trees and ferns.
  • Why it’s awesome: This is a quiet and beautiful waterfall hike where two sides of the wide waterfall plunge into a pool below. A muddy but lovely forest hike takes you there! Read more about this wonderful hike here.
  • Where it is: 30 miles east of Seattle near the town of Duvall; from Duvall, take Cherry Valley road east for 4.5 miles to a T intersection. Park on the street and start behind the yellow gate. Pay attention to the parking signs on the street. See the link above more details about parking here.
  • Best Season: All year! I think this is fantastic winter hike (watch for ice!).
  • Walking or Hiking Distance: 5 miles
  • Elevation gain: 500 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking pass: none (pay attention to parking restrictions which are signed).

Bridal Veil Falls (Stevens Pass)

  • Why it’s awesome: Hike the insanely popular Lake Serene Trail at least as far as Bridal Veil Falls to see an impressive volume of water flying straight down a 100 foot granite wall! Watch out for big crowds on summer weekends.
  • Where it is: On the way to Steven’s Pass from the west; 7 miles East of Gold Bar look for Mt Index Road on the right just past a bridge over the Skykomish River. Follow the road a very short distance and turn right, following the sign to Lake Serene.
  • Best Season: May through October
  • Walking or Hiking Distance: 4 miles
  • Elevation gain: 500 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: yes
  • Parking Pass: Northwest Forest pass

Wallace Falls (Stevens Pass)

  • Why it’s awesome: Of all the waterfalls in Washington, Wallace Falls might be the most visited (at least of the ones requiring a hike). Very popular with families, and very popular in general, watch out for big crowds on summer weekends. Wallace Falls State Park is home to big trees, a lovely river and nine waterfalls!
  • Where it is: Wallace Falls State Park is located near the town of Gold Bar on Highway 2 on the way to Stevens Pass from the west. In Gold Bar, follow the signs to Wallace Falls State Park for 1.5 miles
  • Best Season: All year; winter or rainy days make for far fewer crowds!
  • Walking or Hiking Distance: just under 6 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1300 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking Pass: Washington State Discover Pass

Comet Falls (Mt Rainier National Park)

looking up at a high waterfall coming over a cliff with evergreen trees on both sides of the cliff on a sunny day
  • Why it’s awesome: A gorgeous 320 foot waterfall that comes straight down a cliff after several other smaller waterfalls along the way! Comet Falls is one of Washington’s iconic waterfalls.
  • Where it is: The trailhead has a tiny parking area on the left side of the road from the Nisqually Entrance to Paradise, 4 miles past Longmire.
  • Best Season: late July through October
  • Walking or Hiking Distance: 4 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1300 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: No
  • Parking Pass: $30 per vehicle Mt Rainier National Park Entrance Fee

Teneriffe Falls (East of Seattle)

Looking up from the base of a steep waterfall with water and spray coming down a steep rock face. There are rocks and trees surrounding it
  • Why it’s awesome: One of the least crowded waterfall hikes near Seattle, Teneriffe Falls still has lots of people on summer weekends. This hike is more challenging than it looks as there are several sections of rocks, mud and tree roots to navigate. Bring your rainjacket and get ready to feel the spray from this impressive waterfall!
  • Where it is: Teneriffe Falls is located near North Bend, very near the absurdly popular Mt Si Trail. From I-90, take Exit 32 and then the Mt Si road. The trailhead is located three miles beyond Mt Si.
  • Best Season: By now this probably sounds familiar, but like many waterfalls in Washington, this hike is best in the spring when it has the most water. In June there are gorgeous pink, purple and white foxglove wildflowers along the first part of the trail.
  • Walking or Hiking Distance: 6 miles
  • Elevation gain: 1500 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking Pass: Washington State Discover Pass

Lewis River Falls (Southwest Washington)

  • Why it’s awesome: There are no less than four incredible waterfalls along this long and mellow trail through old growth forest along the Lewis River. If you’re not up for 9 miles, you can turn around at any point and still see at least some of the waterfalls along this trail.
  • Where it is: Lewis River Falls is located in Southwest Washington in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. To get there, take Exit 21 from I-5 just north of Portland and Vancouver, WA. Take Highway 503/Lewis River Road through the town of Cougar. After the Swift Resevoir, turn right to stay on Forest Service Road 90. In about 14 miles, you’ll reach the Lewis River Day Use area, park here (53 miles from the freeway).
  • Best Season: Spring (surprise!) and Fall
  • Walking or Hiking Distance: 9 miles
  • Elevation gain: 450 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking Pass: Northwest Forest Pass

Otter Falls (East of Seattle)

Otter Falls spills over a high rock and then spreads out over the flat surface of a rock next to a small lake. The giant rock face is surrounded by evergreen trees
Otter Falls flows down an impossibly smooth rock face into tiny Lipsy Lake
  • Why it’s awesome: Otter Falls is an absolutely gorgeous waterfall, spilling down a long, high flat rock into tiny Lipsy Lake. It’s a long and mostly flat walk through the forest to get here, but it’s so beautiful it’s worth it! It’s also one of the least crowded waterfalls in Washington even though it’s really close to Seattle!
  • Where it is: At the end of the Middle Fork Snoqualmie Road in North Bend. Park at the end of the road at the Snoqualmie Lake Trailhead.
  • Best Season: Early Spring (March) through Late Fall (November)
  • Walking or Hiking Distance: 10 miles
  • Elevation gain: 700 feet
  • Dogs Allowed: yes, on leash
  • Parking Pass: Northwest Forest pass
A dark green forest with a high and narrow waterfall. Text reads: 25 must see waterfalls in washington state
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Jennie Flaming
Hi! I'm Jennie. I’m a fourth generation Seattleite who lived in Alaska for 7 years. I've been a tour guide in both Alaska and Washington and I love to share the places I love with visitors, newcomers and my fellow locals. I’m so glad to have you along on the journey to experience your best low key adventure in Washington, Alaska and Western Canada!